Information model in Ideaverse

Ideaverse.net website is built on general purpose epistemic model. This model mostly follows real world scientific and philosophical epistemic models.

Main entities in the model:

Term

Term is a word or phrase used to describe a thing or to express a concept

Every word or phrase in a language can be understood as a term (generic usage). For this reason they are treated as Terms (specific usage case) in Ideaverse.

Examples of terms:

  • exist
  • is
  • economy
  • public education
  • free will
  • I

Terms have two main aspects - definition and usage.

Definition of Terms

Terms are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Term and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Terms can be found here - Create a Term.

Terms have following properties:

  • Text - the wording of the term itself. Usually this is the main language form of the term.
  • Language forms - depending on a language the same term can be used in many different forms. For example a noun can have a singular and a plural forms - economy and economies. A verb can have following forms - exist, exists, existed, existing. Definition of Language forms for the Term is optional.
  • Instances - each term can have different meanings depending on the context, every such difference in meaning is called Instance.
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the term. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Tags - One or more tags used to provide simple linking of Entities into simple ad hoc contexts.
  • Url - sanitized name of the term to be used in technical linking of the Term.

Example Term can be inspected here:

exist
verb
  • 1. have objective reality or being
  • 2. be found, especially in a particular place or situation
  • 3. live, especially under adverse conditions

Terms can be embedded into any full text explanation field by using following syntax:

#term([Url or text of the term])

Usage of Terms

Terms are used in Propositions by explicitly linking a word or a phrase with a Term and optionally Term Instance.

Relationships with other Entities

One or more Terms constitute a Proposition. This is equivalent to one or more word constituting a statement.

Proposition

Proposition is a sentence used to describe relationship between Terms

Every sentence or statement in a language can be understood as a proposition (generic usage). For this reason they are treated as Propositions (specific usage case) in Ideaverse.

Examples of propositions:

  • Socrates is mortal
  • The weather outside is great
  • Solution X is bad solution to Y problem
  • X is better than Y

Propositions have two main aspects - definition and usage.

Definition of Propositions

Propositions are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Proposition and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Propositions can be found here - Create a Proposition.

Propositions have following properties:

  • Proposition - The wording of the statement itself.
  • Terms - Statement is divided into words and/or phrases where each such division token is treated as a Term. If a Term needs to be highlighted by giving explicit meaning, then such Term needs to be linked to appropriate existing Term entity and additionally a Term Instance if specific term variation is used.
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the Proposition. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Truth and Validity Properties - A list of epistemic properties for the Proposition. These properties are described in a separate page.
  • Context - Specific Context that groups Propositions into relevant groups.
  • Tags - One or more tags used to provide simple linking of Entities into simple ad hoc contexts.
  • Url - Sanitized name of the Proposition to be used in technical linking of the Proposition.

Example Proposition can be inspected here:

Propositions can be embedded into any full text explanation field by using following syntax:

#proposition([Url or text of the Proposition])

Usage of Propositions

Propositions describe complex ideas that can stand on their own. For example usually one selected Proposition will be treated as a main point that was meant to be proved or disproved.

Propositions are used in Arguments by being Premises or Conclusions of the Argument.

Propositions are linked in Articles to clearly show derivation logic of the Proposition and its structured argumentation.

Theory

Theory is a set of propositions supporting the same thesis

Theory is a set of propositions supporting the same thesis. It groups propositions into one bigger point of view or problem to be represented. Propositions in the Theory can be additionally grouped if needed, and also differing importance can be set.

Examples of theories:

  • Theory of Evolution
  • Workings of Hyperloop as compared to railroad
  • Impact of legalizing marihuana

Theories have two main aspects - definition and usage.

Definition of Theories

Theories are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Theory and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Theories can be found here - Create a Theory.

Theory have following properties:

  • Name - Theory name.
  • Terms - Theory name is divided into words and/or phrases where each such division token is treated as a Term. If a Term needs to be highlighted by giving explicit meaning, then such Term needs to be linked to appropriate existing Term entity and additionally a Term Instance if specific term variation is used.
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the Theory. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Propositions - Grouped list of Propositions for this Theory. The list contains items that are either Propositions or Groups of Propositions.
    • Proposition Item:
      • Proposition - Linked Proposition entity
      • Importance - Enumerated importance value: Critical, Default, Low
    • Group Item:
      • Group Name - Short name for the group
      • Html - Full text explanation for the group
      • Importance - Enumerated importance value: Critical, Default, Low
      • List of child Propositions
  • Truth and Validity Properties - A list of epistemic properties for the Theory. These properties are described in a separate page.
  • Context - Specific Context that groups Theories into relevant groups.
  • Tags - One or more tags used to provide simple linking of Entities into simple ad hoc contexts.
  • Url - Sanitized name of the Theory to be used in technical linking of the Theory.

Example Theory can be inspected here:

Theories can be embedded into any full text explanation field by using following syntax:

#theory([Url or text of the Theory])

Usage of Theories

Theories describe very complex ideas that span multiple propositions and stand on their own. Usually they represent the whole scientific theory or proposed project details.

Theories are linked in Articles to clearly represent the main points of the Theories and comment on them.

Argument

Argument is reasoning process expressed as a set of premises and logic operations given in support or in opposition of an idea or concept

Argument is reasoning process that links one set of Propositions (called premises) to another set of Propositions (called conclusions).

Examples of arguments:

  • Socrates is a man. All men are mortal. Therefore Socrates is mortal.
  • I came to work at 9:05. Work starts at 9:00. Therefore I'm late.
  • All DNR has common structure. Therefore evolution is likely to be true.

Definition of Arguments

Arguments are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Argument and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Arguments can be found here - Create an Argument.

Arguments have following properties:

  • Formal argument - lists of Premises and Conclusions
    • Premises - List of Propositions acting as Premises of the Argument. Premise is also known as a reason or assumption.
    • Conclusions - List of Propositions acting as Conclusions of the Argument.
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the Argument. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Validity Properties - A list of epistemic properties for the Arguments. These properties are described in a separate page.
  • Name - Specific name for the Argument, if Argument is simple or transparent then the name can be skipped.
  • Context - Specific Context that groups Arguments into relevant groups.
  • Tags - One or more tags used to provide simple linking of Entities into simple ad hoc contexts.
  • Url - Sanitized name of the Argument to be used in technical linking of the Argument.

Example Argument can be inspected here:

Arguments can be embedded into any full text explanation field by using following syntax:

#argument([Url or text of the Argument])

Usage of Arguments

Arguments link Propositions together into a network of Propositions that shows reasoning logic in specified Context. Most of the times Arguments are almost transparent and shows up only as a list of Propositions acting either as Premises or Conclusions.

Arguments can be linked in Articles to clearly show reasoning logic.

Context

Context is a group of propositions, arguments and other entities which forms a distinct problem area or domain

Context is a group of entities which forms a distinct problem area or domain.

Contexts are hierarchical and go from broader all encompassing general domains to branches of philosophy and science to narrow problem areas and specific questions. See the Context Tree to view current hierarchy in Ideaverse.

Following entities can have Contexts:

  • Proposition
  • Argument
  • Question
  • Article
  • Range

Examples of Contexts:

  • Mathematics
  • Psychology
  • Religion
  • Free will
  • 1984 (Book)

Definition of Contexts

Contexts are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Context and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Contexts can be found here - Create a Context.

Contexts have following properties:

  • Name - Short name of the context
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the Context. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • Parent Context - Parent Context for this Context. Hierarchy of Contexts is created using this property.
  • Url - Sanitized name of the Context to be used in technical linking of the Context.

Example Context can be inspected here: Psychology

Contexts can not be embedded using special syntax, but they can be linked using simple HTML link functionality.

Usage of Contexts

Contexts group everything into useful chunks of information that can be visualized and understood by user.

Question

Question is a sentence worded in such a way as to elicit information in a form of answers

Question is a sentence worded in such a way as to elicit information in a form of answers. In Ideaverse Questions can be understood like Propositions that have Answers associated with them. One or more Answers in a Question can be marked as an accepted Answer.

Examples of Questions:

  • Does free will exist?
  • Does God exist?
  • What is the meaning of life?
  • What is square root of 4?

Questions have two main aspects - definition and usage.

Definition of Questions

Questions are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Question and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Questions can be found here - Create a Question.

Questions have following properties:

  • Text - The wording of the question itself.
  • Terms - The Question text is divided into words and/or phrases where each such division token is treated as a Term. If a Term needs to be highlighted by giving explicit meaning, then such Term needs to be linked to appropriate existing Term entity, and additionally a Term Instance if specific term variation is used.
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the Question. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Context - Specific Context that groups Questions into relevant groups.
  • Tags - One or more tags used to provide simple linking of Entities into simple ad hoc contexts.
  • Url - Sanitized name of the Question to be used in technical linking of the Question.

Example Question can be inspected here:

Questions can be embedded into any full text explanation field by using following syntax:

#question([Url or text of the Question])

Answers for Questions

Questions are deeply connected to Answers. Question can have zero, one or more Answers. One or more Answer can be selected as an accepted Answer.

See more information regarding Answers:

Usage of Questions

Questions describe points of interest for each Context and stand on their own. A Question is a starting point to inquire more information and get to Propositions and Arguments. Propositions are linked to Questions through Answers.

Questions are linked in Articles to show a starting point for inquiry.

Answer

Answer is a solution to a problem or question

Answer provides a solution to a problem or Question. Answer can have a Proposition linked to it, which explains the Answer fully. For example Answer can be a simple Yes or No statement, but can have fully worded statement and context linked in a Proposition.

One or more Answers in a Question can be marked as an accepted Answer.

Examples of Answers:

  • Yes
  • No
  • 42
  • Andy did it

Definition of Answers

Answers are created differently from other entities in such a way that they are being created from relevant Questions. Answers cannot exist independently from Questions. In order to create an answer go to any Question and find a button called "Add your answer".

Answers have following properties:

  • Text - The wording of the Answer itself.
  • Terms - The Answer text is divided into words and/or phrases where each such division token is treated as a Term. If a Term needs to be highlighted by giving explicit meaning, then such Term needs to be linked to appropriate existing Term entity, and additionally a Term Instance if specific term variation is used.
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the Answer. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Proposition - Optionally linked Proposition that expands on the Answer in more detail.

It is recommended to have minimal information in Answers themselves and put all information into a linked Proposition.

Answers can't be accessed directly, but are part of underlying Question.

Example Answer in a Question can be inspected here:

Usage of Answers

Answers provide different solutions to Questions. They are always associated to Questions and cannot stand on their own.

Article

Article is general purpose text explaining problem area

Article is general purpose text explaining problem area as opposed to splitting it into Entities. Articles work in tandem with other Entities to display information in a most understandable and visual way. Entities can be linked in the Articles and provide entry points into Ideaverse domain.

Definition of Articles

Articles are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Article and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Articles can be found here - Create an Article.

Articles have following properties:

  • Title - The title of the Article.
  • Text - Full text of the Article. Text supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Context - Specific Context that groups Articles into relevant groups.
  • Tags - One or more tags used to provide simple linking of Entities into simple ad hoc contexts.
  • Url - Sanitized title of the Article to be used in technical linking of the Article.

Example Article can be inspected here: Information model in Ideaverse

Articles can not be embedded using special syntax, but they can be linked using simple HTML link functionality.

Usage of Articles

Articles are entry points into problem areas. They provide visual and understandable way to process information provided in Ideaverse.

Range

Range is a set of different distinct variants of the same general type or term

Range is a set of different distinct variants of the same general type or Term. Ranges are similar to Term Instances in sense that both entities provide ways to express different meanings in the text. Term Instances mostly deal with language and different meaning of words. Ranges on the other hand deal with explicit variations in meanings of concepts. Ranges can have multiple dimensions in which variations of the same concept can be constructed.

Examples of Ranges:

Ranges have two main aspects - definition and usage.

Definition of Ranges

Ranges are defined explicitly by creating an instance of entity Range and filling in appropriate properties. Link to create Ranges can be found here - Create a Range.

Ranges have following properties:

  • Title - Title of the Range.
  • Terms - Title is divided into words and/or phrases where each such division token is treated as a Term. If a Term needs to be highlighted by giving explicit meaning, then such Term needs to be linked to appropriate existing Term entity and additionally a Term Instance if specific term variation is used.
  • Qualification of the dimension
    • Qualification of min side of the Range
    • Qualification of max side of the Range
  • Points - Points of variation in a Range
    • Numeric Value - Numeric value of the Point to help order Points in a desired order
    • Name - Name of the Point
    • Explanation - Short explanation, non-HTML text.
    • Full Explanation - Full text explanation of the Point. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
    • Added Properties - Each point optionally adds new properties to the Term.
  • Explanation - Full text explanation of the Range. Extra details or information that did not fit into other structured properties can be added. Explanation supports Markdown syntax and can include other Entities.
  • References - One or more reference to outside literature where further information can be found.
  • Context - Specific Context that groups Ranges into relevant groups.
  • Tags - One or more tags used to provide simple linking of Entities into simple ad hoc contexts.
  • Url - Sanitized name of the Range to be used in technical linking of the Range.

Example Range can be inspected here:

Definition of God
  • Mysterious God
  • Deistic God
  • Theistic God
  • God of Christianity

Ranges can be embedded into any full text explanation field by using following syntax:

#range([Url or text of the Range])

Usage of Ranges

Ranges describe how the Term can have multiple differing meanings in a specific dimension.

Ranges are meant to be included in other Entities to show how the difference in meaning is relevant for specific problem.

Last updated on 7/14/2021

Links

Join our Community!

See a way to improve the content you see? Want to add a comment or a fresh point of view?

Register here to join our community and start contributing!